What you told us

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Since we began our journey towards developing Toronto's first ever Resilience Strategy, we've talked to over 7,000 Torontonians about what resilience means to them, and how we can be a more resilient city. We started with 4 basic goals to guide our engagement process:


1.
COMMUNICATE RESILIENCE
What does resilience mean? What is its relationship to key issues like social inequality and climate change?

2.
INCREASE UNDERSTANDING
Increase understanding of resilience and of Toronto's specific resilience challenges.

3.
ENGAGE BROADLY
Engage through a multi-phased approach, incorporating broad and deep engagement opportunities to give people a chance to participate on their own terms.


4.
GENERATE MEANINGFUL ENGAGEMENT
Engagement should inform all workstreams and build capacity within communities to address resilience at a grassroots level.



Then, we developed a comprehensive consultation process that included a broad range of tools and approaches to fostering conversations about resilience in communities across Toronto. These included:


Icon with peoples' heads in circles connected by lines
7 Community Animators working in Neighbourhood Improvement Areas to foster deep, meaningful conversations with over 200 people
Icon of a wrench
A toolkit designed in collaboration with community animators and used by them in their conversations
Icon of a book
A stories campaign to learn from Torontonians' own experiences of resilience
Icon of a trophy
6 Micro-grants of $500 to film a resilient story highlighting how real Torontonians see and experience resilience
Worldwide web icon
An online survey with 500 responses, a mapping tool, and ideation tool, to collect feedback on how Torontonians experience resilience, and how their resilience is challenged
Library icon
Resilience displays , discussion panels, and other activities in 30 library branches across Toronto
Icon of a telephone
Toronto's first ever Telephone Town Hall, a radio-show style event that engaged over 6,000 people

Workshops with over 100 stakeholders to define the Themes, Vision, Principles, and actions of the Strategy


Engagement by the numbers

7,000+ total participants; 250+ conversations with community animators; 6,360 town hall participants; 500 survey responses; 100+ participants in stakeholder workshops; 26,126 social media engagements

Themes

After our Vision & Principles workshop on September 7th, we combined data from the event with data from all of our previous consultations to identify 155 issues that Torontonians told us affect our city's resilience today. Then, we categorized those 155 issues into 16 themes that we ranked based on intensity, a measure of how often they come up, how long people spoke about them, and how important they were to residents in our online engagement and telephone town hall. The themes are an evolution of the shocks and stresses we introduced in January. They are essentially the most significant resilience challenges and opportunities facing Toronto today.

Low Intensity: Food security, Tech & Data, Economy, Education; Medium Intensity: Transformation, Crime & Safety, Work, Infrastructure, Risk & Crisis Management, Health & Wellness; High Intensity: Equity, Civic Engagement, Climate & Environment, Housing, Getting Around, Community & Neighbourhoods


We decided to focus our efforts on the highest intensity themes, because these are the things Torontonians wanted to talk about the most. For each theme, we took the data we got from our Vision & Principles workshop and articulated where things stand today and where we want to be in the future.


Equity icon of hands shaking


Equity

This theme is about the opportunities that are available to residents in the city, through the ways that they are welcomed and included, the access they have to the things they need, and the ways their views are integrated into the goals of the city.

Where we are today

Where we want to be
unequal access to resources, funding, and opportunities, polarized ideologies, and lack of awareness of vulnerability

communities have greater ownership over decision-making that affects them, including the way resources are distributed. People have access to the things they need to thrive. There is a sense of common goals, broad empathy & understanding, and deliberate efforts towards reconciliation


Civic engagement icon of people talking


Civic Engagement

This theme is about power: the things that influence the ways we make decisions, whose voices are included in decisions, and how we approach leadership.

Where we are today

Where we want to be
lack of diversity of those in power positions, inequity in decision making power, low levels of trust and civic engagement

diverse communities see themselves in their elected representatives, increased civic engagement, trust, and accountable & transparent leadership


Climate & environment icon of a globe and branch


Climate & Environment

This theme is about building practices, use and protection of natural resources, preparedness from weather events, our values around the natural world, and our relationship with the natural and built environments.

Where we are today

Where we want to be
a short-term view of natural resources, uncoordinated, inconsistent sustainability efforts, and action on climate change that leaves the most vulnerable members of our society at the greatest risk of harm

a connection to the environment, an understanding of our effects on the natural world, including our contributions to climate change. Coordinated, large scale climate mitigation and adaptation efforts that incorporate Indigenous ways of thinking about the environment and prioritize protection of the most vulnerable members of society

Housing icon of a house


Housing

This theme is about equity of access to housing, housing affordability, and the limits and opportunities for housing that come from land use planning.

Where we are today

Where we want to be
inequity of housing access, lack of affordable housing options, unsure futures, and lack of creativity in solutions

diverse, creative housing solutions that ensure housing affordability, and an acknowledgement that housing is a human right


Getting around icon of different modes of travel


Getting Around

This theme is about how we move around the city, how we access transit, and the infrastructure that supports movement.

Where we are today

Where we want to be
poor, unreliable, and expensive mobility options, and congested and unsafe streets


multiple reliable, affordable, and safe mobility options that reduce the amount of time it takes to get around


Community & neighbourhoods icon of hands holding


Community & Neighbourhoods

This theme is about how people belong in their community: how people live in their community spaces, and how people want to relate to each other, both interpersonally and through the systems that support everyday life.

Where we are today

Where we want to be
a disparate, disconnected community, where people work in silos

a connected community where people feel a sense of trust and belonging. Silos are broken down and people, organizations, and government work together to solve problems

Since we began our journey towards developing Toronto's first ever Resilience Strategy, we've talked to over 7,000 Torontonians about what resilience means to them, and how we can be a more resilient city. We started with 4 basic goals to guide our engagement process:


1.
COMMUNICATE RESILIENCE
What does resilience mean? What is its relationship to key issues like social inequality and climate change?

2.
INCREASE UNDERSTANDING
Increase understanding of resilience and of Toronto's specific resilience challenges.

3.
ENGAGE BROADLY
Engage through a multi-phased approach, incorporating broad and deep engagement opportunities to give people a chance to participate on their own terms.


4.
GENERATE MEANINGFUL ENGAGEMENT
Engagement should inform all workstreams and build capacity within communities to address resilience at a grassroots level.



Then, we developed a comprehensive consultation process that included a broad range of tools and approaches to fostering conversations about resilience in communities across Toronto. These included:


Icon with peoples' heads in circles connected by lines
7 Community Animators working in Neighbourhood Improvement Areas to foster deep, meaningful conversations with over 200 people
Icon of a wrench
A toolkit designed in collaboration with community animators and used by them in their conversations
Icon of a book
A stories campaign to learn from Torontonians' own experiences of resilience
Icon of a trophy
6 Micro-grants of $500 to film a resilient story highlighting how real Torontonians see and experience resilience
Worldwide web icon
An online survey with 500 responses, a mapping tool, and ideation tool, to collect feedback on how Torontonians experience resilience, and how their resilience is challenged
Library icon
Resilience displays , discussion panels, and other activities in 30 library branches across Toronto
Icon of a telephone
Toronto's first ever Telephone Town Hall, a radio-show style event that engaged over 6,000 people

Workshops with over 100 stakeholders to define the Themes, Vision, Principles, and actions of the Strategy


Engagement by the numbers

7,000+ total participants; 250+ conversations with community animators; 6,360 town hall participants; 500 survey responses; 100+ participants in stakeholder workshops; 26,126 social media engagements

Themes

After our Vision & Principles workshop on September 7th, we combined data from the event with data from all of our previous consultations to identify 155 issues that Torontonians told us affect our city's resilience today. Then, we categorized those 155 issues into 16 themes that we ranked based on intensity, a measure of how often they come up, how long people spoke about them, and how important they were to residents in our online engagement and telephone town hall. The themes are an evolution of the shocks and stresses we introduced in January. They are essentially the most significant resilience challenges and opportunities facing Toronto today.

Low Intensity: Food security, Tech & Data, Economy, Education; Medium Intensity: Transformation, Crime & Safety, Work, Infrastructure, Risk & Crisis Management, Health & Wellness; High Intensity: Equity, Civic Engagement, Climate & Environment, Housing, Getting Around, Community & Neighbourhoods


We decided to focus our efforts on the highest intensity themes, because these are the things Torontonians wanted to talk about the most. For each theme, we took the data we got from our Vision & Principles workshop and articulated where things stand today and where we want to be in the future.


Equity icon of hands shaking


Equity

This theme is about the opportunities that are available to residents in the city, through the ways that they are welcomed and included, the access they have to the things they need, and the ways their views are integrated into the goals of the city.

Where we are today

Where we want to be
unequal access to resources, funding, and opportunities, polarized ideologies, and lack of awareness of vulnerability

communities have greater ownership over decision-making that affects them, including the way resources are distributed. People have access to the things they need to thrive. There is a sense of common goals, broad empathy & understanding, and deliberate efforts towards reconciliation


Civic engagement icon of people talking


Civic Engagement

This theme is about power: the things that influence the ways we make decisions, whose voices are included in decisions, and how we approach leadership.

Where we are today

Where we want to be
lack of diversity of those in power positions, inequity in decision making power, low levels of trust and civic engagement

diverse communities see themselves in their elected representatives, increased civic engagement, trust, and accountable & transparent leadership


Climate & environment icon of a globe and branch


Climate & Environment

This theme is about building practices, use and protection of natural resources, preparedness from weather events, our values around the natural world, and our relationship with the natural and built environments.

Where we are today

Where we want to be
a short-term view of natural resources, uncoordinated, inconsistent sustainability efforts, and action on climate change that leaves the most vulnerable members of our society at the greatest risk of harm

a connection to the environment, an understanding of our effects on the natural world, including our contributions to climate change. Coordinated, large scale climate mitigation and adaptation efforts that incorporate Indigenous ways of thinking about the environment and prioritize protection of the most vulnerable members of society

Housing icon of a house


Housing

This theme is about equity of access to housing, housing affordability, and the limits and opportunities for housing that come from land use planning.

Where we are today

Where we want to be
inequity of housing access, lack of affordable housing options, unsure futures, and lack of creativity in solutions

diverse, creative housing solutions that ensure housing affordability, and an acknowledgement that housing is a human right


Getting around icon of different modes of travel


Getting Around

This theme is about how we move around the city, how we access transit, and the infrastructure that supports movement.

Where we are today

Where we want to be
poor, unreliable, and expensive mobility options, and congested and unsafe streets


multiple reliable, affordable, and safe mobility options that reduce the amount of time it takes to get around


Community & neighbourhoods icon of hands holding


Community & Neighbourhoods

This theme is about how people belong in their community: how people live in their community spaces, and how people want to relate to each other, both interpersonally and through the systems that support everyday life.

Where we are today

Where we want to be
a disparate, disconnected community, where people work in silos

a connected community where people feel a sense of trust and belonging. Silos are broken down and people, organizations, and government work together to solve problems